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Skip the Turkey?

Tofurky

A Delicious Vegetarian Feast
Good News For Vegetarians & Turkeys . . .

"Finally, vegetarians have a bona fide holiday centerpiece that is all their own. They dont have to settle for second best anymore" was how one satisfied customer described it.

Whether you are seeking to offer a meatless option for a portion of your dinner guests or are planning a complete vegetarian feast, Tofurky will satisfy and amaze all who try it.

Tofurky-A Delicious Vegetarian Feast

Click here for complete Tofurky cooking instructions.


Tofurky is a pre-cooked vegetarian feast designed to be the delicious centerpiece of your holiday or everyday meal.  Made from a revolutionary tofu-wheat protein blend, Tofurky is known for its incredible, turkey-like texture and flavor.   Since it was first marketed in 1995, Tofurky has been America's original and best selling alternative to turkey.  The Vegetarian feast consists of four parts:  one Specially Seasoned Stuffed Tofu Roast, four Hearty Tempeh Drummettes, fourteen ounces of Tofurky "Giblet" Gravy and a set of two WishStixs made from Tofurky Jurky!  Each feast is 100% vegan, cooks in about 40 minutes, serves four and tastes fabulous!

 

Stuffed Tofu Roast

At the center of the Tofurky Feast is the Stuffed Tofu Roast.  The outside of this round roast is made from the tofu-vital wheat gluten mixture that can be carved into thin, delectable slices.  Inside the roast is filled with our own wild rice-bread crumb stuffing.  So simple to prepare, the thawed, Stuffed Roasts are basted once with soy sauce, orange juice and your favorite sweetener, wrapped in tin foil and baked at 350F for 40 minutes.  That's all there is to preparing a vegetarian roast that will amaze and satisfy both the skeptical carnivores and enthusiastic herbivores at your table.

Tempeh Drummettes

Since nobody lives by "white bean" alone, we have included these Tempeh Drummettes for "dark bean" lovers as well!  We weren't limited by the anatomy of an animal here so we decided with Tofurky Vegetarian Feast, everyone (four people) deserves a Drummette!  Made from grated soy Tempeh, wild rice, textured soy protein and cranberries, Drummettes are sculpted into a drumstick shape.  Drummettes bake in 20 minutes or microwave in about 2 and are many people's favorite part of the feast.

Tofurky "Giblet" Gravy

This rich brown gravy is the perfect topping for the sliced Tofu Roast and Tempeh Drummettes.  Made with unbleached flour, expeller pressed canola oil, natural flavors, herbs and spices, this gravy is then packed with diced, Tofurky cubes or "Giblets."  This gravy, which is also sold separately, makes an excellent topping for potatoes, rice or other side dishes any time of the year.  It can be heated in a saucepan, microwaved or even boiled in its pouch, there is nothing more to add!

Click here for nutritional information

 

Now with WishStixs!

To begin your feast, we have included 2 Tofurky WishStixs in every box of Tofurky!  Made from our new, Tofurky Jurky, these stixs are meant to add a little bit of fun to your meal.  Gather 2 to 4 folks, have everyone take an end, make a wish and pull!  With Tofurky WishStixs, everyone has already won because no animal was sacrificed in the making of this product.  

 

Let's compare:

  Turkey Tofurky
Has something to pull? Yes Yes
How many can participate? 2 4
Can you eat it? No Yes!

 

Feeds Four Hungry Adults!!

Each Tofurky Contains:


Click Here To Find The Retail Outlet Nearest You

Or Call Toll Free: 1-888-TOFURKY (863-8759)


Testimonials

  Heres what people are saying about Tofurky:

"Tofurky is the best soy product I have ever had!"

  • Russell

  • "This years Tofurky is better than ever! Its awesome. We think it should be available on a year round basis."

  • Jose
    WHOLE FOODS, Northridge, CA

  • "Our customers (and all of us) are in love with your Tofurky Dinner! The Tofurky demo we did was one of our most successful, ever. We cant wait to try the new Tofurky Deli Slices."

  • Lori Sozio, President
    LORIS NATURAL FOODS, Rochester, NY

  • "Tofurky has just done wonders."

  • Mark
    NATURES FRESH NORTHWEST, Portland, OR

  • "An Awesome Product!"

  • Fern, Manager
    WEDGE Coop, Minneapolis, MN

  • TOFURKY DINNER, TESTIMONIALS

    APRIL 8,1999

    We tried our first Tofurky for Easter and really enjoyed it. The leftovers are great, too. Thanks for developing a delicious product that lets us keep eating the kinds of foods we have been choosing and still have holiday traditions. Im glad to learn from your website that you make deli slices; Ill be looking for those at our Wegmans store.

    Pat H.


    April 5, 1999

    To whom it may concern: I just wanted to let you know my husband and I tried the Tofurky dinner (Tofurky, Drummettes, and gravy) yesterday for the first time. We loved it and will purchase it again when our natural food store has them restocked (New City MarketDes Moines, Iowa). Thanks for creating a great product!!!

    P.S. I became aware of the product through PETA and Vegetarian Times "highlight marketing" approaching last Thanksgiving.

    Very satisfied customer


    March 27, 1999

    Dear Turtle Island:

    I have used and enjoyed your products for several years ever since I spied your organic tofu on the supermarket shelf. I bought the whole tofurky feast for one Thanksgiving and we enjoyed it very much. Im glad to hear about the new Tofurky slices and will look for them in the deli section. What I am writing about is your gravy. It is heavenly! As far as I can tell there are no good vegetarian gravies available that I have found and enjoyed as much as yours!

    Peggy E.


    FEATURED NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION: The Vegetarian Resource Group

    Each year we donate a portion of our sales of Tofurky to a worthy nonprofit group. This year's donation goes to The Vegetarian Resource Group in Baltimore, Maryland.

    The Vegetarian Resource Group answers your questions. Visit www.vrg.org for Tofurky recipes, holiday dishes, vegan desserts, vegetarian nutrition information, natural flavors and other "hidden ingredient" details, plus much more.

    To receive a free activity placemat for kids, Vegetarianism for Teens pamphlet, a summary of what is/isn't vegetarian in fast food chains, or ratings of soy milks, send your request along with a self- addressed envelope and 2 first class stamps to VRG, PO Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.

    Like Tofurky and Turtle Island, VRG's health professionals, activists, and educators are making it easier for you to eat healthier and create a more humane world. To learn more from this fine group, contact: The Vegetarian Resource Group, PO Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; (410) 366-VEGE; or go to www.vrg.org


    Ingredients:

    Stuffed Tofu Roast Ingredients: ROAST: water, vital wheat gluten, tofu (water, non-genetically modified soybeans grown without chemical fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides), white beans, garbanzo beans, natural vegetarian flavor, expeller pressed canola oil, shoyu (water, soybeans, wheat), spices, lemon juice, calcium lactate from beets, salt. STUFFING: brown rice, wild rice, bread cubes (wheat, water, salt, yeast) onion, celery, natural vegetarian seasoning, expeller pressed canola oil, herbs and spices.

    Drummettes Ingredients: textured soy protein (soy flour and water), soy Tempeh (non-genetically modified soybeans grown without chemical fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides, water, apple cider vinegar, starter culture), grated carrots, wild rice, malt extract, natural vegetarian flavor, dried cranberries, vegetarian Worcestershire sauce, isolated soy protein, carrageenan, herbs and spices.

    Tofurky Giblet Gravy Ingredients: water, unbleached flour, expeller pressed canola oil, soy sauce (water, soybeans, wheat and culture), Tofurky Giblets [water, vital wheat gluten, tofu (water, non-genetically modified soybeans grown without chemical fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides), white beans, garbanzo beans, natural vegetarian flavor, expeller pressed canola oil, shoyu (water, soybeans, wheat), spices, lemon juice, calcium lactate from beets, salt], natural vegetarian flavor, spices, onion powder, garlic powder, evaporated cane juice, caramel color.

    Tofurky WishStixs Ingredients: Water, vital wheat gluten, tofu (water, soybeans grown without pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers), white beans, garbanzo beans, natural vegetarian flavor, expeller pressed canola oil, shoyu (water, soy beans, wheat, salt), lemon juice from concentrate, calcium lactate from beets, salt, brown sugar, garlic, spices.

     

    Questions? info@tofurky.com  


    This Thanksgiving, you can save a turkey and join a compassionate holiday tradition by participating in Farm Sanctuary's annual Adopt-A-Turkey Project!

    Since its beginning in 1986, the Adopt-A-Turkey Project has saved thousands of turkeys from slaughter, and encouraged millions of people to consider a more compassionate Thanksgiving tradition.

    By adopting a turkey who resides at our New York or California shelter, you'll be helping provide lifelong care for rescued turkeys, and teaching people to extend compassion to all animals. Please join with caring people across the country, and adopt a turkey this holiday season.

    For a $15 adoption fee, you receive a color photograph of your turkey, adoption certificate, and a year's subscription to Farm Sanctuary's quarterly newsletter. A turkey adoption is also a perfect gift for the holidays and a great way to educate your friends and relatives. Please call1-888-SPONSOR to adopt a turkey who lives at Farm Sanctuary.

    Farm Sanctuary is also looking for loving, vegetarian homes for rescued turkeys. If you are interested in saving turkeys through a home adoption, please contact us.





    Why millions of people skip the turkey for Thanksgiving

    Factory Farms

    Massive animal factories using intense confinement have replaced family farms.  15,000 turkeys are crammed together in a single shed with less than three square feet of space each.The overcrowding leads to fighting between birds and self-mutilation due to stress.

    To reduce fighting injuries caused by overcrowding, the tips of the birds' beaks are sliced off using hot blades, and without anesthesia. Some of the
    birds cannot eat after the debeaking and starve. Turkey's toes are amputated without anesthetic.

    The excessive manure causes ammonia burn to the birds' eyes and sometimes leads to blindness. Manure fumes and rotting carcasses cause poultry workers to wear gas masks.

    Factory-farmed animals are subjected to weather extremes if the temperature controls in their building's malfunction. Over 2 million chickens died from heat stress in July 1993 (Las Vegas Journal, 8/1/93)  The Animal Welfare Act does not apply to animals used for food.  The Humane Methods of Slaughter Act excludes poultry.  Jammed in crates they travel for hours to the slaughterhouse without food, water or protection from the weather.

    Free-range turkeys

    Free-range animals are not always protected against severe weather.  Many die from dehydration or freeze to death. In March 1998, Consumer Reports found free-range poultry actually more contaminated with salmonella and campylobacter than ordinary poultry.

    Growth hormones, genetics, and antibiotics

    Feedstuffs 9/9/91: ".turkeys have been bred to grow faster and heavier but their skeletons haven't kept pace, which causes 'cowboy legs'. Commonly the turkeys have problems standing and fall and are trampled on."

    Pathologically obese, commercially bred turkeys develop congestive heart failure and lung disease accompanied by engorged coronary vessels, distended fluid-filled pericardial sacs, abdominal fluid, and gelatin-covered enlarged congested livers.

    Bacteria that harm humans are developing resistance to antibiotics as a direct consequence of antibiotic use in animals, leading to more deadly and
    untreatable infections. (Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, July 94)

    Artificial insemination

    With advances in genetic selection, adult turkey males, or toms, can weigh up to 85 pounds, whereas a hen weighs around 20 pounds when she begins to lay eggs. This size difference makes mating practically impossible.

    Modern turkeys are so heavy and misshapen that they must be artificially inseminated in order to reproduce. The procedure is undertaken twice a week, and is painful and traumatic to both male and female turkeys.

    Essentially 100 percent of the nearly 300 million turkeys produced annually in the U.S. for consumption are the result of artificial insemination. (ARS poultry physiologist Ann M. Donahue, who leads turkey reproductive studies at the Beltsville lab)

    Poultry slaughter

    The National Turkey Federation has successfully opposed humane slaughter protective legislation in the United States.  Handlers frequently break the birds's wings when they snatch them up and stuff them into tiny cages on the transport truck.  At the slaughterhouse, the birds are pulled from the crates and dumped on a conveyor belt. Some birds die after being crushed by machinery or vehicles operating near the unloading area.  Fully conscious birds are hung by their feet from metal shackles on a moving rail.  The birds' heads are submerged in an electrified bath of water, which
    immobilizes them but they are commonly still conscious and capable of feeling pain.  After passing through the stunning tank, the birds' throats are slashed, usually by a mechanical blade, and blood begins rushing out of their bodies.  The blade misses some birds that then proceed to the scalding tank where they are submerged in scalding hot water.  Birds missed by the killing blade are boiled alive. Every day thousand of birds die in the scald tank that follows the bleed-out chamber.  In 1996 the USDA rated the stunning procedures in 50% of the slaughterhouses as unacceptable or a serious problem. (Meat & Poultry, March 97)  Slaughterhouse workers have the highest turnover rate of any occupation in the U.S., as well as the highest rate of on-the-job injury.

    Contamination

    88% of turkeys sampled in USDA's complete baseline study were infected with campylobacter. (Food Chemical News 7/2/6/99)

    36% of turkeys are infected with salmonella. (Turkey World - U.S. Trade Magazine 5/99)

    Contaminated meat and poultry are pouring out of federally inspected slaughterhouses.

    Meat and poultry are covered with abscesses, pus, tumors, feces, and maggots.

    Slaughterhouses are infested with rats and cockroaches.

    Deaths from foodborne illness have quadrupled in the last 15 years.

    Due to faster line speeds at slaughterhouses today, fecal matter is getting on carcasses a lot more often.

    Every year as many as 20,000 Americans get sick from E.coli contamination.

    Tyson Foods plant in Arkansas amassed 1,753 critical violations in 1996 and 4,100 in 1997 before it was closed down.

    Inspectors have 2 seconds to inspect a poultry carcass.

    Less than one out of every 250,000 slaughtered animals is tested for toxic chemical residues.

    Animals are fed and sprayed with antibiotics and pesticides that remain in their bodies and are passed on to the people who eat them.

    The USDA fails to enforce laws

    The USDA has been assigned two radically opposing missions.

    The very same department responsible for developing new and expanded markets for the meat industry is also charged with regulating meat packers, protecting public health, and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. (There are no laws protecting turkeys from inhumane treatment)

    Agribusiness leaders from the private sector have been appointed to administer the USDA's meat inspection program.

    The United States Department of Agriculture enjoys a cozy relationship with the meat industry.

    Meat plants are notified in advance of an inspection.

    When inspectors witness violations they are prohibited from stopping the line by the USDA supervisory staff.

    Instead of wielding their authority to ensure the production of safe meat, USDA officials have done virtually everything in their power to ensure that
    slaughter lines keep running undisturbed.

    Environmental destruction

    Pollution:

    Nationwide, 130 times more animal waste is produced than human waste. (Source: Recent Senate Report)

    The Environmental Protection Agency has identified 60 rivers and streams as impaired due to waste runoff from factory farms and feedlots.

    Last year Pfiesteria the "cell from hell" associated with poultry industry killed 30,000 fish in the Chesapeake Bay.

    A dozen agricultural states are restricting the size of and discharges from factory farms, a similar federal bill is in the works.

    Every year, millions of unmarketable hens are disposed of by dumping which contaminates soil, or by incineration, which results in air pollution.

    Depletion of resources:

    70% of U.S. grain harvest is fed to farmed animals. (USDA, "World Cereals Used for Feed". Apr 91)

    Nearly half of the total amount of water used annually in the U.S. goes to feed and provide drinking water for livestock.

    World Hunger

    While millions around the world face starvation, 90 percent of America's agricultural resources goes to feeding animals the grains and legumes that
    could save human lives

    If Americans reduced their intake of meat by 10%, the grain saved could adequately feed 60 million people.

    An acre of prime land can produce 40,000 lbs. of potatoes, 30,000 lbs. of carrots, 50,000 lbs. of tomatoes, or 250 lbs. of beef (Soil & Water v38, U
    of California Cooperative Extension).

    Twenty vegetarians can be fed on the amount of land needed to feed one person consuming a meat-based diet.



    Health

    According to the American Dietetic Association studies have shown that vegetarians and vegans have a lower risk of breast cancer, colon cancer,
    diabetes milletus, gallstones, heart disease, hypertension, kidney stones, obesity, osteoporosis, and stroke. Vegans are generally closer to their
    ideal weight.

    A third of all Americans are obese.

    The average American consumes nearly twice his or her weight in meat each year. (World Watch Institute)

    People who consume a diverse, plant-based diet, rich in whole grains, vegetables and fruits are by far healthier than those who eat high on the
    food chain.

    Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has announced the four new food groups: fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes. Meat and dairy are not included.

    In the words of Michael Klaper, MD, "Your body has absolutely no nutritional requirements for the flesh or milk of other animals" (Vegan Nutrition: Pure & Simple, 1995) All requirements can be obtained through non-animal sources.

    Plant foods contain no cholesterol, whereas meat, eggs, and dairy products contain large amounts of cholesterol, saturated fats, and concentrated
    protein, all harmful substances.

    According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, a vegetarian diet can prevent 97 percent of coronary occlusions.

    Excessive meat consumption is the principal risk factor in the development of heart disease and many types of cancer.

    Dean Ornish, M.D., a well-known cardiologist from Harvard proved that heart disease can be halted and even reversed by prescribing a vegetarian diet, and regular exercise.

    The high fiber content of a vegetarian diet helps eliminate excess cholesterol in your digestive tract. Whole-wheat bread, brown rice, oats,
    and vegetables supply fiber. Meat, dairy, and eggs supply zero fiber.

    The rate of colon cancer is highest in regions where meat eating is high and lowest where meat eating is common. A similar pattern is evident for breast, cervical, uterine, ovarian, prostate, and lung cancers.

    If a vegan consumes adequate calories, it is virtually impossible not to get enough protein

    Protein - The typical meat-eating American is eating about five times as much protein as needed. According to the U.S. recommended daily allowance (RDA), people should get 8-10% of their calories from protein. Most plant foods greatly exceed this amount of protein per calorie: potatoes 11%, wheat 15%, tomatoes 20%, beans 20-35%, broccoli 45%, and spinach 49%.

    Calcium can be obtained from many different vegetables, nuts, and beans, as well as fortified orange juice and soy milk.

    Iron - garbanzo beans, kidney beans, dried apricots, raisins, figs, spinach, broccoli, kale, watermelon

    Vitamin D - produced by sunshine on skin, 15-20 minutes, 2-3 times a week (extra amounts are stored for months, fortified foods.

    Vitamin B12 - fortified cereals and beverages. Most people have bacteria producing B12 in their throats and intestines. The body needs only miniscule amounts of B12 and vegans rarely show clinical symptoms of B12 deficiency.


    Stop the abuses of factory farming

    The best way to save animals from the misery of factory farming is to stop buying and eating all animal products and start eating a plant-based diet.
    Wear synthetic materials instead of leather and wool.

    Ask your school, company cafeteria, or favorite restaurants to offer more vegetarian options.

    Call FARM toll free at 800-MEAT-OUT for a free info-pack.

    Support legislation that abolishes battery cages, veal crates and intensive confinement systems.

    Write to the USDA demanding enforcement of the Humane Slaughter Act.

    Be aware that our government sustains the meat industry by permitting grazing on public lands, and offering subsidies, price supports and outright
    grants. Let your legislators know how you feel about this.

    Read books about vegetarianism such as Diet for a New America by John Robbins, Slaughterhouse by Gail Eisnitz, and Animal Factories by Jim Mason.  Contact FARM at 800-MEAT-OUT for a list of available books.

    Write to the editor of your newspaper and your state and federal legislator to demand needed reforms.

    Get your church, civic club, or school interested in this critical issue.

    Work with local animal groups, environmental, or consumer protection groups.



    Tofurky is #1 in our house!
    Joyful Hands is a proud sponsor of Tofurky.